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dc.contributor.authorAiarzaguena, José M.
dc.contributor.authorGaminde Inda, Idoia
dc.contributor.authorGrandes, Gonzalo
dc.contributor.authorSalazar, Agustín
dc.contributor.authorAlonso Arbiol, Itziar ORCID
dc.contributor.authorSánchez, Alvaro
dc.date.accessioned2014-04-01T15:02:00Z
dc.date.available2014-04-01T15:02:00Z
dc.date.issued2009-11
dc.identifier.citationBioMed Centrales
dc.identifier.issn1471-2296
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/11900
dc.description.abstractBackground: A new intervention aimed at managing patients with medically unexplained symptoms (MUS) based on a specific set of communication techniques was developed, and tested in a cluster randomised clinical trial. Due to the modest results obtained and in order to improve our intervention we need to know the GPs' attitudes towards patients with MUS, their experience, expectations and the utility of the communication techniques we proposed and the feasibility of implementing them. Physicians who took part in 2 different training programs and in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) for patients with MUS were questioned to ascertain the reasons for the doctors' participation in the trial and the attitudes, experiences and expectations of GPs about the intervention. Methods: A qualitative study based on four focus groups with GPs who took part in a RCT. A content analysis was carried out. Results: Following the RCT patients are perceived as true suffering persons, and the relationship with them has improved in GPs of both groups. GPs mostly valued the fact that it is highly structured, that it made possible a more comfortable relationship and that it could be applied to a broad spectrum of patients with psychosocial problems. Nevertheless, all participants consider that change in patients is necessary; GPs in the intervention group remarked that that is extremely difficult to achieve. Conclusion: GPs positively evaluate the communication techniques and the interventions that help in understanding patient suffering, and express the enormous difficulties in handling change in patients. These findings provide information on the direction in which efforts for improving intervention should be directed.es
dc.description.sponsorshipFunded by the Preventive Services and Health Promotion Research Network (redIAPP 603/170) and by the Health Research Fund (Grant 00/0854) from the Carlos III Institute of Health, Ministry of Health (Madrid, Spain).es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherBMC Family Practice 10 : (2009) // Article n. 73es
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjectmedically unexplained symptomses
dc.subjectgeneral practitionerses
dc.subjectsomatic symptomses
dc.subjectGPSes
dc.subjectreattributiones
dc.subjectinterventionses
dc.subjectexplanationses
dc.titleSomatisation in primary care: experiences of primary care physicians involved in a training program and in a randomised controlled triales
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.holder© 2009 Aiarzaguena et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.es
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2296/10/73es
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1471-2296-10-73
dc.departamentoesPersonalidad, evaluación y tratamiento psicológicoes_ES
dc.departamentoeuNortasuna, balioespena eta psikologia tratamenduaes_ES
dc.subject.categoriaFAMILY STUDIES


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