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dc.contributor.authorCatalán Alcántara, Ana
dc.contributor.authorSimons, Claudia J. P.
dc.contributor.authorBustamante Madariaga, Sonia
dc.contributor.authorDrukker, Marjan
dc.contributor.authorMadrazo, Aranzazu
dc.contributor.authorGonzález de Artaza Lavesa, Maider
dc.contributor.authorGorostiza, Iñigo
dc.contributor.authorVan Os, Jim
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Torres, Miguel Ángel
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T12:46:57Z
dc.date.available2015-12-10T12:46:57Z
dc.date.issued2014-07-14
dc.identifier.citationPLOS ONE 9 (7) : (2014) // Article ID e102520es
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/16413
dc.description.abstractWe wished to replicate evidence that an experimental paradigm of speech illusions is associated with psychotic experiences. Fifty-four patients with a first episode of psychosis (FEP) and 150 healthy subjects were examined in an experimental paradigm assessing the presence of speech illusion in neutral white noise. Socio-demographic, cognitive function and family history data were collected. The Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) was administered in the patient group and the Structured Interview for Schizotypy-Revised (SIS-R), and the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE) in the control group. Patients had a much higher rate of speech illusions (33.3% versus 8.7%, ORadjusted: 5.1, 95% CI: 2.3-11.5), which was only partly explained by differences in IQ (ORadjusted: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.4-8.3). Differences were particularly marked for signals in random noise that were perceived as affectively salient (ORadjusted: 9.7, 95% CI: 1.8-53.9). Speech illusion tended to be associated with positive symptoms in patients (ORadjusted: 3.3, 95% CI: 0.9-11.6), particularly affectively salient illusions (ORadjusted: 8.3, 95% CI: 0.7-100.3). In controls, speech illusions were not associated with positive schizotypy (ORadjusted: 1.1, 95% CI: 0.3-3.4) or self-reported psychotic experiences (ORadjusted: 1.4, 95% CI: 0.4-4.6). Experimental paradigms indexing the tendency to detect affectively salient signals in noise may be used to identify liability to psychosis.es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherPublic Library Sciencees
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjectauditory hallucinationses
dc.subjectgeneral-populationes
dc.subjectschizophreniaes
dc.subjectindividualses
dc.subjectreliabilityes
dc.subjectinstrumentes
dc.subjectfailurees
dc.subjectriskes
dc.subjectcapees
dc.titleNovel Evidence hat Attributing Affectively Salient Signal to Random Noise Is Associated with Psychosises
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.holder2014 Catalan et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.es
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0102520#abstract0es
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0102520
dc.departamentoesNeurocienciases_ES
dc.departamentoeuNeurozientziakes_ES
dc.subject.categoriaAGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
dc.subject.categoriaMEDICINE
dc.subject.categoriaBIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY


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