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dc.contributor.authorRamírez García, Andoni
dc.contributor.authorArteta Ruiz, Beatriz
dc.contributor.authorAbad Díaz de Cerio, Ana
dc.contributor.authorPellón Rodríguez, Aize
dc.contributor.authorAntorán Díaz, Aitziber
dc.contributor.authorMárquez Clavijo, Joana
dc.contributor.authorRementeria Ruiz, Aitor Domingo
dc.contributor.authorHernando Echevarria, Fernando Luis
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-21T12:23:49Z
dc.date.available2013-05-21T12:23:49Z
dc.date.issued2013-01-02
dc.identifier.citationPLoS ONE 8(1) : (2013) // e53584es
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/10139
dc.description.abstractThe dimorphic fungus Candida albicans is able to trigger a cytokine-mediated pro-inflammatory response that increases tumor cell adhesion to hepatic endothelium and metastasis. To check the intraspecific differences in this effect, we used an in vitro murine model of hepatic response against C. albicans, which made clear that tumor cells adhered more to endothelium incubated with blastoconidia, both live and killed, than germ tubes. This finding was related to the higher carbohydrate/protein ratio found in blastoconidia. In fact, destruction of mannose ligand residues on the cell surface by metaperiodate treatment significantly reduced tumor cell adhesion induced. Moreover, we also noticed that the effect of clinical strains was greater than that of the reference one. This finding could not be explained by the carbohydrate/protein data, but to explain these differences between strains, we analyzed the expression level of ten genes (ADH1, APE3, IDH2, ENO1, FBA1, ILV5, PDI1, PGK1, QCR2 and TUF1) that code for the proteins identified previously in a mannoprotein-enriched pro-metastatic fraction of C. albicans. The results corroborated that their expression was higher in clinical strains than the reference one. To confirm the importance of the mannoprotein fraction, we also demonstrate that blocking the mannose receptor decreases the effect of C. albicans and its mannoproteins, inhibiting IL-18 synthesis and tumor cell adhesion increase by around 60%. These findings could be the first step towards a new treatment for solid organ cancers based on the role of the mannose receptor in C. albicans-induced tumor progression and metastasis.es
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by two SAIOTEK grants (S-PE09UN41 and S-PE11UN070) and a consolidated research group IT343/10 of Basque Government,two grants from the University of the Basque Country (UE 03/04 and UE 08/14) and a UFI Grant (UFI11/25) from the University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU. Andoni Ramirez-Garcia was supported by a fellowship from the Government of the Basque Countryes
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherPloS ONEes
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjecthepatic melanoma metastasises
dc.subjectcytokine productiones
dc.subjectproinflammatory responsees
dc.subjectsinusoidal endotheliumes
dc.subjectfilamentous formses
dc.subjectinterleukin-18es
dc.subjectinfectiones
dc.subjectinflammationes
dc.subjectidentificationes
dc.titleCandida albicans Increases Tumor Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells In Vitro: Intraspecific Differences and Importance of the Mannose Receptores
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.holder© 2013 Ramirez-Garcia et al. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.es
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0053584es
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.1371/journal.pone.0053584
dc.departamentoesInmunología, microbiología y parasitologíaes_ES
dc.departamentoeuImmunologia, mikrobiologia eta parasitologiaes_ES
dc.subject.categoriaAGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
dc.subject.categoriaMEDICINE
dc.subject.categoriaBIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY


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