Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBort-Roig, Judit
dc.contributor.authorMartin, Montserrat
dc.contributor.authorPuig-Ribera, Anna
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Suárez, Ángel Manuel
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Lemos, Iván
dc.contributor.authorMartori, Joan Carles
dc.contributor.authorGilson, Nicholas D.
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-05T15:12:31Z
dc.date.available2015-10-05T15:12:31Z
dc.date.issued2014-12-10
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity 11 : (2014) // Article ID 152es
dc.identifier.issn1479-5868
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/15767
dc.description.abstractBackground: Little is known about the types of 'sit less, move more' strategies that appeal to office employees, or what factors influence their use. This study assessed the uptake of strategies in Spanish university office employees engaged in an intervention, and those factors that enabled or limited strategy uptake. Methods: The study used a mixed method design. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with academics and administrators (n = 12; 44 +/- 12 mean SD age; 6 women) at three points across the five-month intervention, and data used to identify factors that influenced the uptake of strategies. Employees who finished the intervention then completed a survey rating (n = 88; 42 +/- 8 mean SD age; 51 women) the extent to which strategies were used [never (1) to usually (4)]; additional survey items (generated from interviewee data) rated the impact of factors that enabled or limited strategy uptake [no influence (1) to very strong influence (4)]. Survey score distributions and averages were calculated and findings triangulated with interview data. Results: Relative to baseline, 67% of the sample increased step counts post intervention (n = 59); 60% decreased occupational sitting (n = 53). 'Active work tasks' and 'increases in walking intensity' were the strategies most frequently used by employees (89% and 94% sometimes or usually utilised these strategies); 'walk-talk meetings' and ` lunchtime walking groups' were the least used (80% and 96% hardly ever or never utilised these strategies). 'Sitting time and step count logging' was the most important enabler of behaviour change (mean survey score of 3.1 +/- 0.8); interviewees highlighted the motivational value of being able to view logged data through visual graphics in a dedicated website, and gain feedback on progress against set goals. 'Screen based work' (mean survey score of 3.2 +/- 0.8) was the most significant barrier limiting the uptake of strategies. Inherent time pressures and cultural norms that dictated sedentary work practices limited the adoption of 'walk-talk meetings' and ` lunch time walking groups'. Conclusions: The findings provide practical insights into which strategies and influences practitioners need to target to maximise the impact of 'sit less, move more' occupational intervention strategies.es
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors gratefully acknowledge the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation for providing the funding as well as the support of the academic and administrative staff from the Spanish universities who made this study possible.es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherBiomed Centrales
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjectworkplacees
dc.subjectoccupational sittinges
dc.subjectsedentary behavioures
dc.subjectwalkinges
dc.subjectmulti-method studyes
dc.subjectemployee experienceses
dc.subjectphysical-activity programes
dc.subjectrandomized control triales
dc.subjectsitting timees
dc.subjectmulticomponent interventiones
dc.subjectsedentary behaviores
dc.subjectenergy-expenditurees
dc.subjecthealth outcomeses
dc.subjectstand deskses
dc.subjectat-workes
dc.subjectworkplacees
dc.titleUptake and factors that influence the use of 'sit less, move more' occupational intervention strategies in Spanish office employeeses
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.holder© 2014 Bort-Roig et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise statedes
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.ijbnpa.org/content/11/1/152/abstractes
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12966-014-0152-6
dc.departamentoesEducación física y deportivaes_ES
dc.departamentoeuGorputz eta Kirol Hezkuntzaes_ES
dc.subject.categoriaMEDICINE
dc.subject.categoriaNUTRITION AND DIETETICS


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record