Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorSala, Nohemi
dc.contributor.authorArsuaga, Juan Luis
dc.contributor.authorPantoja-Pérez, Ana
dc.contributor.authorPablos, Adrián
dc.contributor.authorMartínez, Ignacio
dc.contributor.authorQuam, Rolf M.
dc.contributor.authorGómez Olivencia, Asier ORCID
dc.contributor.authorBermúdez de Castro, José María
dc.contributor.authorCarbonell, Eudald
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-15T11:57:03Z
dc.date.available2016-04-15T11:57:03Z
dc.date.issued2015-05-27
dc.identifier.citationPLOS ONE 10(5) : (2015) // Article ID e0126589es
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/17921
dc.description.abstractEvidence of interpersonal violence has been documented previously in Pleistocene members of the genus Homo, but only very rarely has this been posited as the possible manner of death. Here we report the earliest evidence of lethal interpersonal violence in the hominin fossil record. Cranium 17 recovered from the Sima de los Huesos Middle Pleistocene site shows two clear perimortem depression fractures on the frontal bone, interpreted as being produced by two episodes of localized blunt force trauma. The type of injuries, their location, the strong similarity of the fractures in shape and size, and the different orientations and implied trajectories of the two fractures suggest they were produced with the same object in face-to-face interpersonal conflict. Given that either of the two traumatic events was likely lethal, the presence of multiple blows implies an intention to kill. This finding shows that the lethal interpersonal violence is an ancient human behavior and has important implications for the accumulation of bodies at the site, supporting an anthropic origin.es
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the Ministerio de Economia y Competitividad of the government of Spain (Project Nos. CGL2012-38434-C03-01, 02 & 03). CT scanning was carried out in collaboration with the Laboratorio de la Evolucion Humana at the Universidad de Burgos (Spain) with funding provided by the Junta de Castilla y Leon Project No. BU005A09. Fieldwork at the Atapuerca sites was funded by the Junta de Castilla y Leon and the Fundacion Atapuerca. N.S and A.P.P. have received postdoctoral and predoctoral respectively grants from the Fundacion Atapuerca. R.M.Q. has received financial support from Binghamton University (SUNY).es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherPublic Library Sciencees
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MINECO/CGL2012-38434
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjectblunt head traumaes
dc.subjectspain hominin samplees
dc.subjectlos huesos atapuercaes
dc.subjectbreakage patternses
dc.subjectpostmortem intervales
dc.subjectfracture patternses
dc.subjectskull fractureses
dc.subjectbone-fractureses
dc.subjectforce-traumaes
dc.subjectsimaes
dc.titleLethal Interpersonal Violence in the Middle Pleistocenees
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.holder© 2015 Sala et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.es
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0126589#abstract0es
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0126589
dc.departamentoesEstratigrafía y paleontologíaes_ES
dc.departamentoeuEstratigrafia eta paleontologiaes_ES
dc.subject.categoriaAGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
dc.subject.categoriaMEDICINE
dc.subject.categoriaBIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record