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dc.contributor.authorEspinosa Alejos, María Paz
dc.contributor.authorKovarik, Jaromir
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-29T12:23:15Z
dc.date.available2016-04-29T12:23:15Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-14
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience 9 : (2015) // Article ID 88es
dc.identifier.issn1662-5153
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/18110
dc.description.abstractThis study revisits different experimental data sets that explore social behavior in economic games and uncovers that many treatment effects may be gender-specific. In general, men and women do not differ in "neutral" baselines. However, we find that social framing tends to reinforce prosocial behavior in women but not men, whereas encouraging reflection decreases the prosociality of males but not females. The treatment effects are sometimes statistically different across genders and sometimes not but never go in the opposite direction. These findings suggest that (i) the social behavior of both sexes is malleable but each gender responds to different aspects of the social context; and (ii) gender differences observed in some studies might be the result of particular features of the experimental design. Our results contribute to the literature on prosocial behavior and may improve our understanding of the origins of human prosociality. We discuss the possible link between the observed differential treatment effects across genders and the differing male and female brain network connectivity, documented in recent neural studies.es
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful to the Editor and the reviewers, and to David Rand for providing data and useful discussions. We acknowledge financial support from the Basque Government (IT-783-13), the Spanish Government (ECO 2012-31626, ECO 2012-35820), and GACR (14-22044S).es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherFrontiers Research Foundationes
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjectgenderes
dc.subjectprosocial behaviores
dc.subjecttreatment effectses
dc.subjecteconomic gameses
dc.subjectaltruismes
dc.subjectother-regarding behaviores
dc.subjectdictator gameses
dc.subjecthuman braines
dc.subjectsex-differenceses
dc.subjectemotion regulationes
dc.subjectsocial distancees
dc.subjectchildrenes
dc.subjectagees
dc.subjectconnectivityes
dc.subjectpreferenceses
dc.titleProsocial behavior and genderes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.holder© 2015 Espinosa and Kovářík. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution and reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.dedtheoriginal author(s) orlicensorarecreditedandthattheoriginalpublicationinthisjournal is cited,inaccordancewithacceptedacademicpractice.Nouse,distributionor reproduction ispermittedwhichdoesnotcomplywiththesetermses
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00088/full#h1es
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fnbeh.2015.00088
dc.departamentoesFundamentos del análisis económico Ies_ES
dc.departamentoeuEkonomia analisiaren oinarriak Ies_ES
dc.subject.categoriaBEHAVIORAL NEUROSCIENCE
dc.subject.categoriaNEUROPSYCHOLOGY AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY
dc.subject.categoriaCOGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE


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