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dc.contributor.authorGarcía-Baquero Moneo, Gonzalo
dc.contributor.authorCrujeiras, Rosa M.
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-04T10:34:20Z
dc.date.available2016-05-04T10:34:20Z
dc.date.issued2015-03
dc.identifier.citationEcology and Evolution 5(5) : 1088-1099 (2015)es
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/18158
dc.description.abstractPlant community ecologists use the null model approach to infer assembly processes from observed patterns of species co-occurrence. In about a third of published studies, the null hypothesis of random assembly cannot be rejected. When this occurs, plant ecologists interpret that the observed random pattern is not environmentally constrained - but probably generated by stochastic processes. The null model approach (using the C-score and the discrepancy index) was used to test for random assembly under two simulation algorithms. Logistic regression, distance-based redundancy analysis, and constrained ordination were used to test for environmental determinism (species segregation along environmental gradients or turnover and species aggregation). This article introduces an environmentally determined community of alpine hydrophytes that presents itself as randomly assembled. The pathway through which the random pattern arises in this community is suggested to be as follows: Two simultaneous environmental processes, one leading to species aggregation and the other leading to species segregation, concurrently generate the observed pattern, which results to be neither aggregated nor segregated - but random. A simulation study supports this suggestion. Although apparently simple, the null model approach seems to assume that a single ecological factor prevails or that if several factors decisively influence the community, then they all exert their influence in the same direction, generating either aggregation or segregation. As these assumptions are unlikely to hold in most cases and assembly processes cannot be inferred from random patterns, we would like to propose plant ecologists to investigate specifically the ecological processes responsible for observed random patterns, instead of trying to infer processes from patternses
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research and publication was possible thanks to a postdoctoral fellowship at The Open University (UK) and the project "Development of the recovery plan for A. rioxana in la Rioja. Measures of research, monitoring and control (University of Salamanca)", both funded by the Regional Government of La Rioja (Spain)es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherWiley Blackwelles
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjectassembly processeses
dc.subjectdistance-based redundancy analysises
dc.subjectlogistic regressiones
dc.subjectnull model analysises
dc.subjectsimulationes
dc.subjectspecies co-occurrencees
dc.subjectsoftwater lakeses
dc.subjectmacrophyte communitieses
dc.subjectchemical compositiones
dc.subjectaquatic macrophyteses
dc.subjectsoft waterses
dc.subjecteutrophicationes
dc.subjectacidificationes
dc.subjectdiversityes
dc.subjectpyreneeses
dc.titleCan environmental constraints determine random patterns of plant species co-occurrence?es
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.holderª 2015 The Authors. Ecology and Evolution published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. This is an open access article under the terms of the C reative Commons Attributi on License, which permi ts use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.es
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.1349/fulles
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.1349
dc.departamentoesBiología vegetal y ecologíaes_ES
dc.departamentoeuLandaren biologia eta ekologiaes_ES


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