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dc.contributor.authorPuig-Ribera, Anna
dc.contributor.authorMartínez-Lemos, Iván
dc.contributor.authorGiné-Garriga, María
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Suárez, Ángel Manuel
dc.contributor.authorBort-Roig, Judit
dc.contributor.authorFortuño, Jesús
dc.contributor.authorMuñoz-Ortiz, Laura
dc.contributor.authorMcKenna, Jim
dc.contributor.authorGilson, Nicholas D
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-06T11:52:57Z
dc.date.available2016-05-06T11:52:57Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-31
dc.identifier.citationBMC Public Health 15 : (2015) // Article ID 72es
dc.identifier.issn1471-2458
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/18177
dc.description.abstractBackground: Little is known about how sitting time, alone or in combination with markers of physical activity (PA), influences mental well-being and work productivity. Given the need to develop workplace PA interventions that target employees' health related efficiency outcomes; this study examined the associations between self-reported sitting time, PA, mental well-being and work productivity in office employees. Methods: Descriptive cross-sectional study. Spanish university office employees (n = 557) completed a survey measuring socio-demographics, total and domain specific (work and travel) self-reported sitting time, PA (International Physical Activity Questionnaire short version), mental well-being (Warwick-Edinburg Mental Well-Being Scale) and work productivity (Work Limitations Questionnaire). Multivariate linear regression analyses determined associations between the main variables adjusted for gender, age, body mass index and occupation. PA levels (low, moderate and high) were introduced into the model to examine interactive associations. Results: Higher volumes of PA were related to higher mental well-being, work productivity and spending less time sitting at work, throughout the working day and travelling during the week, including the weekends (p < 0.05). Greater levels of sitting during weekends was associated with lower mental well-being (p < 0.05). Similarly, more sitting while travelling at weekends was linked to lower work productivity (p < 0.05). In highly active employees, higher sitting times on work days and occupational sitting were associated with decreased mental well-being (p < 0.05). Higher sitting times while travelling on weekend days was also linked to lower work productivity in the highly active (p < 0.05). No significant associations were observed in low active employees. Conclusions: Employees' PA levels exerts different influences on the associations between sitting time, mental well-being and work productivity. The specific associations and the broad sweep of evidence in the current study suggest that workplace PA strategies to improve the mental well-being and productivity of all employees should focus on reducing sitting time alongside efforts to increase PA.es
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors gratefully acknowledge the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (MICCIN) for providing the funding (project reference DEP 2009-1147) as well as the support of the academic and administrative staff from the Spanish universities who made this study possible.es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherBiomed Centrales
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjectmeasured sedentary behaviores
dc.subjectrated healthes
dc.subjectscale wenwbses
dc.subjectadultses
dc.subjectpresenteeismes
dc.subjectworkplacees
dc.subjectquestionnairees
dc.subjectoutcomeses
dc.subjectleisurees
dc.subjectsitting timees
dc.subjectphysical activityes
dc.subjectmental well-beinges
dc.subjectwork productivityes
dc.subjectoffice employeeses
dc.titleSelf-reported sitting time and physical activity: interactive associations with mental well-being and productivity in office employeeses
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.holder© 2015 Puig-Ribera et al.; licensee BioMed Central. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly credited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise statedes
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12889-015-1447-5#Abs1es
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12889-015-1447-5
dc.departamentoesEducación física y deportivaes_ES
dc.departamentoeuGorputz eta Kirol Hezkuntzaes_ES
dc.subject.categoriaPUBLIC, ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH


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