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dc.contributor.authorRosenthal, Clive R.
dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Samantha K.
dc.contributor.authorAntoniades, Chrystalina A.
dc.contributor.authorKennard, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorSoto, David
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-02T11:45:36Z
dc.date.available2017-03-02T11:45:36Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationRosenthal, C.R., Andrews, S., Antoniades, C.A., Kennard, C., & Soto, D. (2016). Learning and recognition of a non-conscious sequence of events in human primary visual cortex. Current Biology 26(6), 834–841, Doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.01.040es
dc.identifier.issn0960-9822
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/20847
dc.descriptionPublished Online: March 03, 2016es
dc.description.abstractHuman primary visual cortex (V1) has long been associated with learning simple low-level visual discriminations [1] and is classically considered outside of neural systems that support high-level cognitive behavior in contexts that differ from the original conditions of learning, such as recognition memory [2, 3]. Here, we used a novel fMRI-based dichoptic masking protocol—designed to induce activity in V1, without modulation from visual awareness—to test whether human V1 is implicated in human observers rapidly learning and then later (15–20 min) recognizing a non-conscious and complex (secondorder) visuospatial sequence. Learning was associated with a change in V1 activity, as part of a temporo-occipital and basal ganglia network, which is at variance with the cortico-cerebellar network identified in prior studies of ‘‘implicit’’ sequence learning that involved motor responses and visible stimuli (e.g., [4]). Recognition memory was associated with V1 activity, as part of a temporo-occipital network involving the hippocampus, under conditions that were not imputable to mechanisms associated with conscious retrieval. Notably, the V1 responses during learning and recognition separately predicted non-conscious recognition memory, and functional coupling between V1 and the hippocampus was enhanced for old retrieval cues. The results provide a basis for novel hypotheses about the signals that can drive recognition memory, because these data (1) identify human V1 with a memory network that can code complex associative serial visuospatial information and support later nonconscious recognition memory-guided behavior (cf. [5]) and (2) align with mouse models of experiencedependent V1 plasticity in learning and memory [6].es
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Wellcome Trust (WT073735MA; C.R.R. and C.K.; http://www.wellcome.ac.uk/), the Medical Research Council (UK, 89631; D.S.; http://www.mrc.ac.uk/), the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Oxford Biomedical Research Centre based at Oxford University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Oxford (C.R.R., C.A.A., and C.K.; http://oxfordbrc.nihr.ac.uk/), and the Dementias and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Network (C.A.A.; https://www.crn.nihr.ac.uk/dementia).es
dc.language.isoenges
dc.publisherCurrent Biologyes
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses
dc.subjectrecognition memoryes
dc.subjectnon-conscious memoryes
dc.subjectprimary visual cortexes
dc.subjectsequence learninges
dc.subjecthippocampuses
dc.subjectimplicites
dc.subjectrelationales
dc.titleLearning and Recognition of a Non-conscious Sequence of Events in Human Primary Visual Cortexes
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees
dc.rights.holderCurrent Biology 26, 834–841, March 21, 2016 © 2016 The Authorses
dc.relation.publisherversionhttp://www.cell.com/current-biology/homees
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.cub.2016.01.040
dc.subject.categoriaAGRICULTURAL AND BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
dc.subject.categoriaBIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY


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