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dc.contributor.authorGonzález de Artaza Lavesa, Maider
dc.contributor.authorCatalán Alcántara, Ana
dc.contributor.authorAngosto, Virxinia
dc.contributor.authorValverde, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorBilbao, Amaia
dc.contributor.authorVan Os, Jim
dc.contributor.authorGonzález Torres, Miguel Ángel
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-14T11:46:49Z
dc.date.available2018-11-14T11:46:49Z
dc.date.issued2018-02-15
dc.identifier.citationPloS One 13 : (2018) // Article ID e0192373es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/29651
dc.description.abstractBackground This is an extension of a paper published earlier. We investigated the association between the tendency to detect speech illusion in random noise and levels of positive schizotypy in a sample of 185 adult healthy controls. Materials and methods Subclinical positive, negative and depressive symptoms were assessed with the Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences (CAPE); positive and negative schizotypy was assessed with the Structured Interview for Schizotypy-Revised (SIS-R). Results Speech illusions were associated with positive schizotypy (OR: 4.139, 95% CI: 1.074-15.938; p = 0.039) but not with negative schizotypy (OR: 1.151, 95% CI: 0.183-7.244; p = 0.881). However, the association of positive schizotypy with speech illusions was no longer significant after adjusting for age, sex and WAIS-III (OR: 2.577, 95% CI: 0.620-10.700; p = 0.192). Speech illusions were not associated with self-reported CAPE measures. Conclusions The association between schizotypy and the tendency to assign meaning in random noise in healthy controls may be mediated by cognitive ability and not constitute an independent trait.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherPublic Library Sciencees_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectgeneral-populationes_ES
dc.subjecthallucinationses_ES
dc.subjectschizophreniaes_ES
dc.subjectreliabilityes_ES
dc.subjectsaliencees_ES
dc.titleCan an Experimental White Noise Task Assess Psychosis Vulnerability in Adult Healthy Controls?es_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.holderCopyright: © 2018 Gonzalez de Artaza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)es_ES
dc.rights.holderAtribución 3.0 España*
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0192373es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0192373
dc.departamentoesNeurocienciases_ES
dc.departamentoeuNeurozientziakes_ES


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Copyright: © 2018 Gonzalez de Artaza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.
Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Copyright: © 2018 Gonzalez de Artaza et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. Attribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)