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dc.contributor.authorLuthra, Sahil
dc.contributor.authorFuhrmeister, Pamela
dc.contributor.authorMolfese, Peter J.
dc.contributor.authorGuediche, Sara
dc.contributor.authorBlumstein, Sheila E.
dc.contributor.authorMyers, Emily B.
dc.date2020-09-12
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-14T12:20:39Z
dc.date.available2020-01-14T12:20:39Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.citationSahil Luthra, Pamela Fuhrmeister, Peter J. Molfese, Sara Guediche, Sheila E. Blumstein, Emily B. Myers, Brain-behavior relationships in incidental learning of non-native phonetic categories, Brain and Language, Volume 198, 2019, 104692, ISSN 0093-934X, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104692.es_ES
dc.identifier.issn0093-934X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/38275
dc.descriptionAvailable online 12 September 2019.es_ES
dc.description.abstractResearch has implicated the left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG) in mapping acoustic-phonetic input to sound category representations, both in native speech perception and non-native phonetic category learning. At issue is whether this sensitivity reflects access to phonetic category information per se or to explicit category labels, the latter often being required by experimental procedures. The current study employed an incidental learning paradigm designed to increase sensitivity to a difficult non-native phonetic contrast without inducing explicit awareness of the categorical nature of the stimuli. Functional MRI scans revealed frontal sensitivity to phonetic category structure both before and after learning. Additionally, individuals who succeeded most on the learning task showed the largest increases in frontal recruitment after learning. Overall, results suggest that processing novel phonetic category information entails a reliance on frontal brain regions, even in the absence of explicit category labels.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by NIH grant R01 DC013064 to EBM and NIH NIDCD Grant R01 DC006220 to SEB. The authors thank F. Sayako Earle for assistance with stimulus development; members of the Language and Brain lab for help with data collection and their feedback throughout the project; Elisa Medeiros for assistance with collection of fMRI data; Paul Taylor for assistance with neuroimaging analyses; and attendees of the 2016 Meeting of the Psychonomic Society and the 2017 Meeting of the Society for Neurobiology of Language for helpful feedback on this project. We also extend thanks to two anonymous reviewers for helpful feedback on a previous version of this manuscript.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherBrain and Languagees_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccesses_ES
dc.subjectNon-native phonetic perceptiones_ES
dc.subjectImplicit learninges_ES
dc.subjectInferior frontal gyruses_ES
dc.titleBrain-behavior relationships in incidental learning of non-native phonetic categorieses_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.holder© 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.es_ES
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/journal/brain-and-languagees_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bandl.2019.104692


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