Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorPérez-Salamero González, Juan Manuel
dc.contributor.authorRegúlez Castillo, Marta
dc.contributor.authorVentura Marco, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorVidal Meliá, Carlos
dc.date.accessioned2022-09-15T17:38:47Z
dc.date.available2022-09-15T17:38:47Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal for Equity in Health 21 : (2022) // Article ID 96es_ES
dc.identifier.issn1475-9276
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10810/57748
dc.description.abstractBackground Research has generally found a significant inverse relationship in mortality risk across socioeconomic (SE) groups. This paper focuses on Spain, a country for which there continues to be very little evidence available concerning retirement pensioners. We draw on the Continuous Sample of Working Lives (CSWL) to investigate disparities in SE mortality among retired men aged 65 and above over the longest possible period covered by this data source: 2005-2018. We use the initial pension income (PI) level as our single indicator of the SE status of the retired population. Methods The mortality gradient by income is quantified in two ways: via an indicator referred to as "relative mortality", and by estimating changes in total life expectancy (LE) by PI level at ages 65 and 75 over time. We show that, should the information provided by the relative mortality ratio not be completely clear, a second indicator needs to be introduced to give a broad picture of the true extent of inequality in mortality. Results The first indicator reveals that, for the period covered and for all age groups, the differences in death rates across PI levels widens over time. At older age groups, these differences across PI levels diminish. The second indicator shows that disparities in LE at ages 65 and 75 between pensioners in the lowest and highest income groups are relatively small, although slightly higher than previously reported for Spain. This gap in LE widens over time, from 1.49 to 2.54 years and from 0.71 to 1.40 years respectively for pensioners aged 65 and 75. These differences are statistically significant. Conclusions Along with other behavioral and structural aspects, a combination of factors such as the design of the pension system, the universality and quality of the health system, and high levels of family support could explain why LE inequalities for retired Spanish men are relatively small. To establish the reasons for this increased inequality in LE, more research needs to be carried out. An analysis of all Spanish social security records instead of just a sample would provide us with more information.es_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors are grateful for the financial assistance received. This work was supported by: Basque Government (Project IT1336-19): Marta Regulez-Castillo, Carlos Vidal Melia and Juan Manuel Perez-Salamero Gonzalez. Spanish Ministry of Science, Innovation, and Universities MCIN/AEI/https://doi.org/10.13039/501100011033, I + D + i PID2020-114563GB-I00, Carlos VidalMelia, Juan Manuel Perez-Salamero Gonzalez and Manuel Ventura-Marco.es_ES
dc.language.isoenges_ES
dc.publisherBMCes_ES
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MICINN/PID2020-114563GB-I00es_ES
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccesses_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectinequalitieses_ES
dc.subjectlife expectancyes_ES
dc.subjectmortalityes_ES
dc.subjectsocioeconomices_ES
dc.titleMortality and life expectancy trends in Spain by pension income level for male pensioners in the general regime retiring at the statutory age, 2005-2018es_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articlees_ES
dc.rights.holder© The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.es_ES
dc.rights.holderAtribución 3.0 España*
dc.relation.publisherversionhttps://equityhealthj.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12939-022-01697-2es_ES
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12939-022-01697-2
dc.departamentoesMétodos Cuantitativoses_ES
dc.departamentoeuMetodo Kuantitatiboakes_ES


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

© The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as © The Author(s) 2022. This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated in a credit line to the data.